Build A Tree House | Tips To Build A Tree House

Build A Tree House | Tips To Build A Tree House

When preparing of Building A Tree House, the house itself is not the first thing to consider. Tree selection is most important because not every type of tree will work for supporting this type of structure. Certain types of trees are stronger and more ideal than others. Size is also a factor, as your tree house will not be stable if the tree is so small or too narrow. Choosing optimal surroundings (not too close to other trees, hanging over a neighbor’s fence, or obstructing the neighbor’s view), is vital for a structure that you want to be longstanding. Once those things are determined, preparing the tree for construction is your next step. Below are tips on how to choose and prepare a tree, as well as the tools you’ll need to get the job done right.

Tools needed for prepping your tree

  • Scaffold
  • Sharpened pruning shears
  • Sharpened pruning saw with a telescoping pole

**Consider hiring an arborist if cutting more than small branches**

Best trees for tree house building

Start by examining the tree’s structure. A good Building A Tree House will be strong and free of disease and rot. Some types of trees that have proven to be successful in this type of structure include apple trees, oak, fir, ash, and also beech trees. Other prime choices include hemlock, cedar, and maple, along with many other deciduous trees. Weaker varieties include elm and sycamore, as they are often prone to disease.

A good tree house should last ten to fifteen years, so it would be worth your while to find out the age of the tree before the build. Trees that are too young won’t be strong enough to hold up a structure, so it may be dangerous to rely on their stability. They also tend to grow rapidly, so it may be challenging to determine whether or not your tree house would be affected by the growth. Likewise, if a tree is too old, it may not be strong enough and is more susceptible to rot, damaged, or disease. It also may not live as long as your tree house.

Check for lightning damage, wind damage, and other damage to the trunk, core or roots. Sometimes damaged branches can be cut at the collar and the tree might still be a good candidate. But the damage to any of those main sections (core, root, or trunk) is a warning sign. Some may prefer to hire an arborist to inspect the tree as a precaution, especially since the structure is being built for children.

What size tree is best?

The size of the tree needed depends on the size of your tree house. The diameter of the trunk is most important. If your tree house is a standard size of eight by eight, look for a tree with a trunk that is at least twelve feet in diameter. But if your tree house is smaller, adjust the tree size accordingly. Again, be mindful of how much weight your tree can bear. You want to build your tree house within the lower third of your tree. Consider using a scaffold to thoroughly inspect all parts of the tree. Although an experienced professional arborist can come to do an inspection to let you know if you’ve made a wise choice.

Choosing or preparing the best surroundings

A tree house should be in an area free from the daily hustle and bustle. This will help keep it sturdy for years to come. Choose a tree that not only has the qualities above but is set apart from other trees. It should also be set back from areas where a family’s daily activities will take place. Keep in mind that some Building A Tree House may require more than one tree. In this case, of course, those trees should be near each other but apart from other trees. Building a tree house can put some strain on a tree, so be careful to put the least stress on the tree as possible. Otherwise, use beams to support the house.

Pruning or chopping your tree

Once you’ve chosen one or more Building A Tree House, it is time to start pruning. Check to see that your pruning tools are sharp and ready. Be sure to cut at the collar for any branches that need to be removed. Leave all cuts bare and clean and avoid using any finishes or sealers. Trees that are treated with coatings are more vulnerable to fungus and other diseases, which can shorten the lifespan of your tree. Be careful not to put any strain on the trunk, core, or roots of your tree. Take advantage of good, strong branches that are thick. You can utilize these as support while building your tree house. Smaller, weak branches can be cut away if they are in the way of construction. Pruning should be done well before building your tree house. It should also be done as routine maintenance to keep your structure safe and strong.

 

 

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